Homemade marshmallow Easter eggs

There is a lot of controversy about Cadbury here in NZ. For what was once a kiwi favourite, they’ve done themselves no favours in recent years. Causing huge public backlash, they used palm oil in their chocolate (although they don’t anymore, having swapped back to cocoa butter). Their chocolate blocks have shrunk in size yet only slightly decreased in price. They closed the Cadbury factory in Dunedin, and most recently, they’ve messed with the beloved box of Roses. Don’t even get me started on the Creme Eggs.

Thank goodness we’re lucky enough to have Whittaker’s Chocolate who have been making chocolate in NZ since 1896. Their factory is still in Porirua, where it’s been since 1969, and it’s owned by the third generation of Whittakers. They make my absolute favourite, the peanut butter block.

I used to love marshmallow Easter eggs. When we were little, my dad used to melt one in the microwave and we’d eat it with a teaspoon. But they’re not what they used to be and are now so sickly sweet. The NZ public are constantly asking Whittaker’s to make their own version, but here’s one you can try in the meantime.

I’ve used a very basic marshmallow recipe (no yucky corn syrup) and they’re coated in silky Whittaker’s chocolate. They’re fluffy and delicious and good for the kids to decorate.

I used these moulds for the eggs. You can also make a mould out of flour. Fill a roasting tin with about 6 cups of flour then gently press an egg to make an impression. The marshmallow won’t stick to the flour (you won’t need to use the coating). Here’s a smaller version.IMG_6638

Ingredients

1½c icing sugar
1c cornflour
2 tablespoons gelatine (I used McKenzie’s brand)
½c water
2c sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1c water
1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract
400g chocolate (dark is best)

Method

Prepare the marshmallow coating by sifting the icing sugar and cornflour together in a bowl. Sift this over the moulds and then use your finger to wipe it all around the mould, making sure there are no gaps. Place your moulds on baking trays.

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In a small heatproof bowl, combine the gelatine and first measure of water and whisk well. Leave to bloom for 10 minutes.
In a medium saucepan, add the sugar, salt and second measure of water. Over a medium heat, let the sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally.
Heat the gelatine in the microwave for 40 seconds, making sure the gelatine is completely dissolved. Add to the sugar mixture and whisk until combined.
Bring the mixture to the boil then boil steadily for 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool for 20 minutes.
Pour the mixture into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on high until the mixture is very thick and white. Add the vanilla and beat for another minute.

Spoon the marshmallow into a piping bag and pipe into the prepared egg moulds. Give the baking trays a good couple of taps on the bench top to burst any air bubbles, then sift more coating over the tops of the eggs. Set in the fridge for one hour.

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Add one cup of the marshmallow coating to a small dish. When the marshmallows are set, gently pop them out of the moulds and toss them in the coating, then place them on the baking tray.

Melt the chocolate in a microwave or double boiler until smooth and glossy. Allow to cool slightly. Using two forks, dip each egg in the chocolate and turn it over ensuring it’s evenly coated. Scrape excess chocolate off on the side of the bowl then place the egg on the baking tray. Pop them back in the fridge until set.

You can also decorate them in melted white chocolate, or with sprinkles etc.
Store them in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Notes

  • Store any leftover marshmallow coating in an airtight container. It will keep for months.
  • Marshmallow recipe adapted from the Edmonds Cookery Book.

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